Archive for September, 2014


An Introduction to Web Servers: Part 2

A web server will typically run as a daemon (system service) under a single application process. That initial process will then spawn child processes that handle virtual servers, individual websites, or even individual requests. As such, a web server could spawn hundreds or even thousands of processes per day, per hour, or even […]

An Introduction to Web Servers: Part 1

Once you have chosen an operating system, setup some basic security, and decided on a web-based control panel, you will need to decide what software you will run on your server. Some control panels will install your software for you, but it may be worth it to choose one that is right for your […]

How to Fix the Bash Shellshock Vulnerability on Linux

In the previous post, we explained how to check your Linux server for the highly publicized Shellshock vulnerability in Bash. Fortunately, most, if not all, major Linux distributions have already uploaded the fix into their package management repositories. All you have to do is install the latest version. Unfortunately, there is some evidence to suggest […]

How to Check Your Server for Bash Shellshock Vulnerability

The hosting world has been hit with yet another highly publicized server vulnerability. This one affects the ubiquitous shell program GNU Bash and is referred to as Shellshock. Most Linux, BSD and Mac OS X operating systems and variants use Bash or derivatives of it. All Bash versions between versions 1.14 and 4.3 are […]

Server Architecture: Past, Present, and Future – Part 3

The Future
One challenge that chip makers have juggled is the power requirements for faster chips and the heat output associated with them. In some cases, cooling fans and heat sinks have become inefficient ways to keep chips cool, leading a few to invest in liquid cooling and other unconventional methods.
As the world becomes more […]

Server Architecture: Past, Present, and Future – Part 2

Other companies that produce x86 processors include Cyrix, AMD, and VIA. AMD, in particular, has become Intel’s biggest competitor.
At the turn of the century, Intel introduced their high-powered 64-bit processor line called IA-64 or Itanium. Originally produced at HP, Intel later joined in the development with the intention of making server-class processors to […]

Server Architecture: Past, Present, and Future – Part 1

Servers have evolved significantly over the past three decades. At one time, a single server filed an entire room, required its own cooling system, and had processors that ran slower than many of today’s mobile phones. Today, servers are smaller, faster, and more energy efficient, but the most important element is still the […]

How to Add/Remove Yum Repositories

Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS, Fedora and other Linux distributions based on RHEL all use YUM as a package management system to install, remove, and update software. Each distribution has its own main repository, but you can also install or remove third-party repositories whenever you like.
To add a YUM repository, type as root:
yum-config-manager –add-repo repository_url
For […]

How to Add and Remove APT Repositories

Ubuntu based Linux distributions rely on a program called APT to handle package management. Using the command “apt-get”, you can install, remove and update other programs. The packages installed with APT are determined by software repositories, and while every Linux distribution has default repositories, you can also add or remove third-party sources.
To add a Personal […]

Top Web Server Software for Dedicated Servers

Netcraft publishes a list of the web’s most widely used web server software every month. Here is a brief look at each of those top web servers and what they can do.
Microsoft IIS (37% market share) – Microsoft Internet Information Services is the web server designed specifically for Microsoft Windows Server operating […]

Understanding Systemd and How to Use It: Part 2

In part one, you learned a little about what systemd is and which Linux distributions plan to use it. In part 2, you will learn how to use systemd to start and stop services. We will use Red Hat Enterprise Linux, CentOS and Fedora in the explanation, but most of it will apply to other […]

Understanding Systemd and How to Use It: Part 1

Systemd has gradually made a name for itself in the Linux world and is or will eventually be the default service management system for a number of major Linux distributions. Those accustomed to the old init systems will not find Systemd to be horribly complex, but it does feature some significantly different approaches to service […]

How to Configure Linux Password Policies

One of your best weapons in the fight for server security is strong password management. Using the password policies you set in Linux, you enforce strong passwords, require password renewals and many other effective security measures.
First, you should install the cracklib module for PAM. Cracklib tests password strength. If you are using RHEL, CentOS or […]

4 Common Open Source Licenses

As you enter the world of server management, you are likely going to encounter free and open source software. Even a Windows system administrator these days will likely have to at least run Linux in a virtual machine at some point. Therefore, having a little background knowledge on how Linux and other open source software […]