How to Configure Linux Password Policies

One of your best weapons in the fight for server security is strong password management. Using the password policies you set in Linux, you enforce strong passwords, require password renewals and many other effective security measures.
First, you should install the cracklib module for PAM. Cracklib tests password strength. If you are using RHEL, CentOS or […]

Setup and Configure CentOS Server Part 2

In part one, we began by changing the root password and then creating an account that will be able to escalate to root privileges when needed. Now, you need to make sure that only that user can become root and not anyone else.
The easiest way to do this is to use the “wheel” group. You […]

How to Lock User Accounts After Login Failure

Few web hosting users are robotic enough to always type their usernames and passwords perfectly every time they try to log in, but repeated failed attempts to access an account could be evidence of a security problem. As a precaution, it is a good idea to have accounts locked after a number of failed […]

Linux Server Password Complexity

On a dedicated server, password complexity determines the length and character combinations of user passwords. In Linux password management is controlled by PAM (pluggable authentication modules), which is installed by default.
Unfortunately, configuring PAM is no walk in the park. Once you figure it out, however, you will not have to configure it very […]

Server User Password Management: Best Practices

Managing a dedicated server requires a bit of babysitting. Even though most website owners and users have been told once or possibly even several times to make secure passwords, many do not. They may actually have pretty good reasons to use weak passwords, especially if they have multiple accounts in various systems.
Because of […]